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May 10: Bringing Tigers Back from the Brink, a discussion hosted by CEI, Washington DC
Published on : Monday, May 06, 2013
Competitive Enterprise Institute is hosting a discussion on tiger conservation on May 10, 2013, at their office in Washington, DC. Barun Mitra of Liberty Institute will share his thoughts on the implications of reintroduction and rewilding of tigers, and their release in their natural habitat, based on the recent developments at the Panna Tiger Reserve in central India.
Climate of Politics vs Economics of Development
Published on : Thursday, December 02, 2010
What is common to such diverse environmental agendas like the annual meeting of UNFCC opened in Cancun, Mexico and the first global summit on tiger conservation which was held in St. Petersburg, Russia last week is that they offer enormous opportunity to political leaders to escape accountability. If one claims to speak of protecting the interest of future generations, the leaders can be sure that the future generations will not be able to hold them politically accountable for any misdeed. Such agendas tend to be political blank cheques!, writes Barun Mitra in the Liberty Institute website.
Making sense of the tiger farming debate
Published on : Wednesday, November 17, 2010
Tigers face the serious threat of extinction. The threats mainly include poaching and supplying of tiger body parts in the illegal market.There are gaps in understanding between specialists in natural science, law enforcement and economics. There are several misconceptions like the demand for tiger products is “too high” or “exceeds supply, and that wild and farmed tiger products are perfect substitutes for each other, writes Michael ‘t Sas-Rolfes and Kirsten Conrad in Tiger-economics.com.
Tiger Preservation in a Nutshell
Published on : Thursday, September 02, 2010
China signed an international convention which bans the trade of tiger parts in 90's. Tiger skin and bones are best selling commodities in many parts of the world. People who want a ba sould be willing to bear the cost of maintaining tigers. It shouldn't be forgotten that pigs are doing well under captive breeding., when it a new thing to breed tigers. Banning poaching would be similar to a ban on all traffic to avoid traffic accidents. Tigers could be preserved only through free trade, writes Dean Peng.
Tigers and Economies
Published on : Wednesday, August 25, 2010
This is the Chinese year of the tiger and people are interested in saving the tiger from extinction more than ever. Several conferences are being held, and a lot of money is being thrown at saving the tiger, but all this can't work if the Government can't mitigate the conflict between locals and wild animals. The lack of agricultural productivity forces farmers to encroach on the habitat of the tigers. This has to be resolved. China and India can save the tigers by cooperating with each other, writes Barun Mitra in The Wall Street Journal.
Save the tiger: Environmental dividend from economic development
Published on : Wednesday, August 25, 2010
This is the Chinese year of the tiger and people are interested in saving the tiger from extinction more than ever. Several conferences are being held, and a lot of money is being thrown at saving the tiger, but all this can't work if the Government can't mitigate the conflict between locals and wild animals. The lack of agricultural productivity forces farmers to encroach on the habitat of the tigers. This has to be resolved. China and India can save the tigers by cooperating with each other, writes Barun Mitra.
Crouching Tigers, Hidden Dragons: Changing climate in China India relations
Published on : Thursday, August 12, 2010
The winds of change between the two giants could impact not only the environment but also politics. In this article published in the special issue (July-August 2010) of the "India China Chronicle", Barun Mitra looks at the possible implications of the cooperation between these two countries at the climate conference in Copenhagen, last year. Possibly, a much bigger opportunity lies in the field of wildlife conservation, particularly in saving the tiger.
So, are you for the tigers or the tribals?
Published on : Wednesday, April 09, 2008
A comparison of forest department records with satellite imagery from the Forest Survey of India (2003) suggests that, at least, about 12.4 per cent (about 96,000 sq km) of India's recorded forest cover is misclassified. Put simply, when you consider that entire communities of people are being rendered criminals purely for living as they traditionally have, it becomes evident that the status quo is contrary to any principles of a democratic society, writes Anant Sudarshan in the Indian Express.
How to kill a tiger
Published on : Monday, March 17, 2008
The present unhappy situation of the tiger is rooted in the fact that the new rich class in China are voraciously "demanding" tiger bones, tiger organs and tiger skins. We certainly need an efficient, modern, vigorous Tiger Protection Force. But simultaneously with raising the cost of poaching the wild tiger, we should create a supply of authentic tiger skins, tiger bones and tiger parts to feed the demands of the Chinese market. And keep the species thriving in the wild by breeding it in captivity for body parts, writes Jaithirth Rao in the Indian Express
NZ man calls on China to allow sale of tiger body parts to save species
Published on : Monday, August 13, 2007
"Make poaching unprofitable. We have created a monopoly for these guys and people are dreaming if they think it is going to stop. We are making them rich and it is not helping the tigers. I can't see any other way around this." At the risk of horrifying conservationists, Dr Brendan Moyle, senior lecturer at Massey University, believes the Chinese Government should allow tiger farms to trade tiger parts, so poachers are unable to sell them on the black market, helping to prevent extinction. Dr Moyle is interviewed by New Zealand Herald newspaper.
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